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SQUID, decarboning combustion chamber, compression rings, carbon knock ping engine Northstar Caddy

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SQUID, decarboning combustion chamber, compression rings, carbon knock ping engine Northstar Caddy

  #1  
Old 04-25-2008, 08:57 PM
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Default SQUID, decarboning combustion chamber, compression rings, carbon knock ping engine Northstar Caddy


ORIGINAL: slowroll

1 qt of oil consumed in 1k miles is high, oil rings are likely stuck.

Depending on miles and length of ownership may be able to get factory assist. Same family = 1 owner. If no help you could try GM top engine cleaner - follow instructions on can and do WOT til exhaust cleans up.

Then once a week see if it helps.

There is a squid procedure which is a more aggressive decarboning procedure will cost 400-600.00.

Decarboning is an attempt to use a chemical to desolve carbon and free rings and correct oil consumption. Lastly re-ring and pistons $$$$.
slowroll,

i just had to find out and here it is
from the US Patents office ...


=========================


Combustion chamber decarboning squid

United States Patent 6557517

Inventors:[/align] Augustus, Richard (Wichita, KS)
Erwin, Harold E. (Augusta, KS)


A device for and method of decarboning a combustion chamber and compression rings in an internal combustion engine. The device is a squid shaped container with a cylindrical body, a screw cap, and conduits depending from the body for transmitting cleaner to the combustion chambers on the engine. Once cleaner is transmitted to the combustion chambers, the engine is bumped to work the fluid into the compression rings. When the engine is bumped, the device allows the cleaner to be vented to the device to avoid hydrolocking the engine. The device also contains the cleaner so that it is not splashed outside the engine.


The present invention relates to the decarboning of the combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine using a liquid cleaner. More specifically, the present invention relates to the cleaning of the compression rings on the piston associated with the combustion chamber.

The typical internal combustion engine has at least one combustion chamber associated with a piston. On the piston are a pair of compression rings. The compression rings serve to prevent the escape of gases from the chamber around the sides of the piston during the compression stroke of the engine. The only known method of effectively cleaning compression rings is to overhaul the engine. Overhauling involves dismantling the engine, cleaning any carbon coated parts, putting in new rings, and then reassembling. It is extremely costly and time consuming.

Further, some modem engines (i.e., the Cadillac Northstar®) cannot be overhauled because of the way they are constructed. Because they cannot be overhauled, carbon buildup on the compression rings in these kinds of engines is a major concern. If the buildup on the rings becomes so great that compression within the combustion chamber unacceptable, the engine must be replaced.

This has resulted in these modern engines earning the nickname “throw-away engines.” Even though overhauling is the only effective prior art method for cleaning the compression rings, liquid cleaners have been used to clean combustion chambers in the past. One such method involves manually pouring an alcohol based cleaner into the combustion chamber after removing the spark plug and leaving the spark plug hole open.

This method has two disadvantages.

First, alcohol based products tend to cause the carbon deposits to break off rather than dissolve. When carbon deposits break off between the piston rings, they become trapped. These trapped particles can cause engine problems.

Second, the open spark plug hole does not allow the user to activate the pistons during the cleaning to work the cleaner into and between the compression rings in an effective manner. If the user were to activate the pistons under this prior art method, the cleaner would splash out of the open spark plug hole. Splashed engine cleaners can eat away at external parts of the engine causing irreparable damage. Splash can be prevented by capping the spark plug hole after the cleaner has been poured in. However, capping the hole also precludes the mechanic from activating the pistons while cleaner is in the chamber.

The cleaner can become trapped when the piston is in the upper range of its motion in the chamber because it cannot escape out the spark plug hole. The trapped fluid is not compressible (as is air), so the back pressure resists the movement of the piston so that the engine will not turn over. This is called “hydrolocking.”

Hydrolocking an engine can cause tremendous damage to the engine's pistons and rods. SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION It is therefore an objective of the present invention to provide a clean and simple method of inducing and maintaining cleaner in the combustion chamber during the cleaning process and an apparatus for enabling such. It is a further objective of the present invention to provide a way of maintaining cleaning fluid in the combustion chamber at the same time as activating the piston that prevents fluid from being spilled onto other engine components or hydrolocking the engine.

It is yet another objective of the present invention to provide a pressurized blowout procedure whereby fluid is forced through the exhaust system of the vehicle after cleaning by way of the application of pressurized air. These objectives are accomplished using a new device. The device resembles and is hereinafter referred to as a “squid.” The squid has a cylindrical body with sub-cavities into which cleaner is poured. Each sub-cavity is associated with a conduit which is used to deliver the cleaner to a particular combustion chamber in an engine. Each conduit is connected to an adapter that screws into the engine block of the vehicle being serviced. The adapters are easily screwed into the spark plug opening in the combustion chamber after removing the spark plug.

The squid enables the user to clean the compression rings of the piston without overhauling the engine. Clean piston rings are essential for maintaining ideal compression ratios within the combustion chamber. The loss of compression within the combustion chamber is caused by a principle called blow-by. The build up of carbon deposits on the compression rings can cause these rings to not sit flush against the cylinder walls. This creates small gaps between the compression ring and the cylinder wall. These gaps cause the compressed air in the combustion chamber to inappropriately blow past the compression rings downwardly past the piston. This lowers engine compression ratios. Poor compression ratios can greatly reduce performance, increase harmful emissions and even completely disable an engine. Also, engine oil can enter the combustion chamber where it is burned and consumed, creating more deposits and increasing engine oil consumption.

The present invention is the only known solution to blow-by problems in a combustion chamber without overhauling the engine.









.
 
Attached Thumbnails SQUID, decarboning combustion chamber, compression rings, carbon knock ping  engine Northstar Caddy-gm-squid.jpg  

Last edited by Stealth; 11-06-2009 at 09:35 PM.
  #2  
Old 04-26-2008, 02:50 PM
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Default RE: Combustion chamber decarboning squid


Anyone knows if the SQUID is used while cranking the engine?
Bumped to me means .. a slight starter turn.


 
  #3  
Old 04-27-2008, 10:19 AM
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Default RE: Combustion chamber decarboning squid

"Squid" uses a module with a timer to engage (bump) starter. Ideally engine rotates 90 degrees every 15 min.s during decarboning cycle of process. Although it's claim to fame is with Northstar stuck piston rings.It is also been used in Northstar and the LS series engines for "carbon knock". Carbon Knock - where excess carbon builds up on top of piston and causes a knocking or tapping noise as the cold carbon strikes cylinder head when engine is cold, generally lasting up to 3 minutes. The heat from combustion softens the carbon as engine warms up, and noise goes away.
 
  #4  
Old 04-28-2008, 12:32 AM
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Default SQUID, carbon knock, decarboning, Northstar and LS engines


GM Cadillac engine decarboning for:

1. stuck compressions rings
2. carbon knock / knocking / ping / pinging



ORIGINAL: slowroll

"Squid" uses a module with a timer to engage (bump) starter. Ideally engine rotates 90 degrees every 15 min.s during decarboning cycle of process.

Although it's claim to fame is with Northstar stuck piston rings.It is also been used in Northstar and the LS series engines for "carbon knock". Carbon Knock - where excess carbon builds up on top of piston and causes a knocking or tapping noise as the cold carbon strikes cylinder head when engine is cold, generally lasting up to 3 minutes. The heat from combustion softens the carbon as engine warms up, and noise goes away.


slowroll,

I read the whole thing and it doesnt specify what cleaner it uses.. Do you know?

Gumout?
Seafoam?
solvent?

How does the device keep the cleaning fluid from exiting through the exhaust valves down the exhaust system and into the catalytic?

One would also assume an oil change when its all said and done .. no?




.
 
  #5  
Old 09-14-2008, 05:21 AM
Join Date: Sep 2008
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Default RE: SQUID, carbon knock, decarboning, Northstar and LS engines

Has anyone actually had this performed, and what were the perceived benefits? I have over 150K on mine and have been burninga quart every 500 to 1500 miles since new depending upon how hard I drive it. This is with synthetic, I get almost a 2:1 improvement using dead dinosaur however, a qt every 1200 to 2000 miles.
 
  #6  
Old 09-14-2008, 10:48 AM
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Default RE: SQUID, carbon knock, decarboning, Northstar and LS engines

ORIGINAL: 95Seville

Has anyone actually had this performed, and what were the perceived benefits? I have over 150K on mine and have been burning quart every 500 to 1500 miles since new depending upon how hard I drive it. This is with synthetic, I get almost a 2:1 improvement using dead dinosaur however, a qt every 1200 to 2000 miles.
slowroll is our resident technician/mechanic, actually works at a dealership and has done many of these.

synthetic oil has a smaller molecule size and will seep though pores and gaps where the dyno-oil cannot get through, therefore the "blends."

you didnt state if you have performed the WOT .. look in our FAQ and follow it EXACTLY, then see what you got.





.



 
  #7  
Old 03-24-2009, 08:13 AM
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Default

slowroll,

what cleaner does it use ?

Gumout?
Seafoam?
solvent?
other?

.
 

Last edited by Stealth; 03-24-2009 at 08:28 AM.
  #8  
Old 03-24-2009, 08:01 PM
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Default

The "Squid" apparatus I believe is controlled by BG products which to many pro-techs are the best on the market. BG Induction System Cleaner is the chemical. Their products are not always easily available to the general public, most parts store don't carry them. GM did come out with a process to decarbon engine without using "Squid" apparatus. Some other Auto Suppliers have come out with similar processes to GM. TSB 02-06-01-009C details GM's approach. Visit BG Products website more info on "Squid"
 
  #9  
Old 11-06-2009, 09:26 PM
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from the US patent office
the numbered sequence referes to sketch in 1st post.


-----------------------


DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT

The present invention solves the prior art problems noted above by creating a cleaning fluid distributing and maintaining squid 10 shown in FIG.'s 1 - 3 . The more general aspects of the invention can be observed in FIG. 1 . The squid ring decarbonater 10 has four primary components: (i) a screw cap 12 , (ii) a cylindrical body 14 , (iii) a plurality of conduits 16 , and (iv) a plurality of spark plug adaptors 18 . Adaptors 18 are used to deliver cleaning fluid to an internal combustion engine 20 (see FIG. 4 ).
A suspension hook 22 is used to hang squid 10 from the open hood of the vehicle being serviced (not pictured) and is connected to body 14 by a bracket 23 .

Body 14 is sealed at its upper end when screw cap 12 is screwed on. Screw cap 12 is used to seal off the top of body 14 . The specific details of cap 12 can best be seen in FIG. 3 . FIG. 3 shows that pressurized air can be delivered through cap 12 into the cylindrical body 14 by way of a cylindrical bore 24 . A snap-on connector 26 is used to connect to a pressurized air hose 28 . When connected, pressurized air travels from the pressurized air hose 28 through the snap on connector 26 through an elbow 30 down through the bore 24 and into body 14 . Cap 12 is secured by engaging a set of male threads 32 on cap 12 with a set of female threads 34 on body 14 .

As can be seen in FIG.'s 2 and 3 , body 14 is bored out to create a main cylinder cavity 36 . Bored out below main cylinder cavity 36 are a plurality of sub-cavities 38 which receive and hold cleaning fluid. Also part of body 14 are a plurality of threaded openings 40 which are used to receive mating threads 44 on each of a plurality of conduits 16 .

These conduits 16 are valved. The valves 42 on each conduit 16 have upper threads 44 and lower threads 46 . Each valve 42 is opened or shut using a valve control lever 48 . The valves themselves 42 may be common ball valves or any other type of valve known in the art capable of optionally opening up or shutting off flow. The upper threads 44 are used to mesh with the threaded openings 40 on the bottom of the cylindrical body 14 to secure the conduit 16 thereto and permit flow into the conduit from the main body. The lower threads 46 on the valve are received by threads on a first threaded connector that is connected to a translucent tubing 52 . Translucent tubing 52 be constructed of nylon material capable of withstanding the chemicals transmitted through it. At the other end of the translucent tubing 52 is a second threaded connector 54 . The second threaded connector 54 is used to attach the spark plug adaptor 18 .

The spark plug adaptor 18 has a set of upper end threads 56 which are used to mate with the second threaded connector 54 of the conduit 16 . The adaptor 18 also has a set of header engaging threads 56 which are of the same pitch and size as the threads on an ordinary spark plug. The adapter 18 is essentially a hollow tube which defines a metered compression rate controlling passageway 60 . Passageway 60 is used to control the compression rate through the adaptor 18 and conduit 16 during back flow of fluid through the system. This is done by boring passageway to a diameter that allows a limited amount of forced flow there through.

As can be seen in FIG. 4 , the spark plug receiving threads 62 on the spark plug holes 70 on the vehicle's header 20 are used to receive header engaging threads 58 on the adaptor 18 . This connects the adaptor 18 to the header 62 allowing the passage of fluid into the engine's combustion chamber 64 . The combustion chamber 64 is sealed at its lower end by a piston head 66 . At the top of the combustion chamber 64 are intake 67 and exhaust 68 valves and spark plug opening 70 . The typical piston head 66 has a pair of compression rings 72 at its upper end which are used to compressibly seal off the combustion chamber 64 from below. A single oil ring 74 is used to seal off the combustion chamber from the seepage up of oil from below during suction stroke of engine 20 .

The squid decorboning process has four steps. First, squid 10 must be filled with cleaner. Second, squid 10 is used to transmit the cleaner from the squid to fill the combustion chambers on the vehicle being serviced. Third, the engine is “bumped” in order to work the cleaner the compression rings. Finally, the cleaner is blown out of the combustion chamber under pressure administered by the squid. Before beginning the decarboning process, engine 20 should be brought up to operating temperature (usually 195 to 200 degrees) so that the carbon deposits become softer. This makes them easier to be cleaned. It's also very important to disable the ignition coils to prevent electrical damage to the ignition system.

With respect to the first step of filling the squid, Cap 12 should be removed from the body 14 to expose main cavity 36 and eight sub-cavities 38 . The user should make sure that all of the valves 42 are closed. Next, each of the spark plugs on the engine 20 should be removed and replaced with adapters 18 . (See FIG. 4 ). Adapters 18 are attached by screwing header engaging threads 58 into each threaded spark plug opening 70 for combustion chamber 64 on engine 20 . As can be seen in FIG. 3 , conduits 16 should then be secured to the conduit end threads 56 on each of the adaptors 18 that have been secured to the engine 20 . It is apparent that with engines with fewer than eight cylinders, some conduits 16 will be left over after all of the adaptors 18 have been hooked up to a conduit 16 . These left over conduits 16 will remain idle during the cleaning process. As can best be seen from FIG. 3 , each conduit 16 is associated with a particular sub-cavity 38 . Next, sub-cavities 38 should be filled with cleaner.

The preferred cleaner of the present invention is a solvent offered by BG Products, Inc. located in Wichita, Kans. and sold under the name BG 211 Induction System Cleaning, BG Part 211. The composition of the solvent is readily ascertainable from the label of the product. This solvent is preferred over the alcohol based solvents used in the prior art methods described above because it dissolves the carbon particles rather than breaking them off. As described in the background section above, carbon particles can be problematic when they are trapped between the compression rings of a piston. While this BG 211 solvent is the preferred solvent of the system, it is to be understood that other solvents capable of dissolving carbon deposits may also be used and are within the scope of the present invention.

Only the sub-cavities 38 that are associated with attached conduits 16 should be filled. The sub-cavities 38 that are associated with idle conduits 16 should not. After filling the appropriate sub-cavities 38 , cap 12 should be screwed on to body 14 . The hood of the vehicle to be serviced (not pictured) should be opened up and suspension hook 22 used to hang the squid 10 from the hood. The underside of a typical car hood has an opening near the hood latch that can be used to receive the hook 22 . Once hung, squid 10 is ready to fill the combustion chambers with cleaner.

To fill the combustion chambers with cleaner, the valve control levers 48 on each of the hooked up conduits 16 should be turned to open position. This means that for an eight cylinder engines all eight will be opened up. However, for a smaller engine, such as a four-cylinder, only four of the valves would be opened up and the remaining four would remain closed. Once the appropriate valves 42 have been opened up, the cleaning solution will run down the conduits 16 through the metered compression rate controlling passageway 60 into the combustion chamber 64 of the engine 20 . The valves 42 should remain open during the steps that follow.

The third step involves bumping the engine. Bumping means that the user will briefly turn the ignition starter so that the pistons move up and down only a couple of inches. Since the cleaner is now in the combustion chambers 64 , the cleaner will be massaged into the rings. This bumping process is impossible with any of the prior art methods. As explained in the background section, the prior art methods involved either capping or uncapping opening 70 . Capping opening 70 while bumping the engine 20 results in hydrolocking the engine when the piston is in its up-stroke. Leaving opening 70 uncapped while bumping causes cleaner to spew out chamber 64 onto outside engine components causing them to decompose if they are susceptible to the harsh chemicals in most cleaners.

These prior art dilemmas have been overcome by the squid 10 . When the piston is in its up-stroke, squid 10 allows the cleaner to be vented up into the metered portion 60 of the adaptor 18 (see FIG. 3 ) and through the conduit 16 back up into the body 14 . The metered section 60 of the adaptor 18 serves to control the pressurization rate of the fluid such that it can be safely delivered through the conduit 16 up into its respective sub-cavity 38 . The squid acts as a vent releasing the cleaner from the combustion chamber, while at the same time safely containing it. This prevents any damage to the piston or rods that could be caused by hydrolocking the engine.

On the down-stroke of piston 66 , however, the fluid will be drawn back down out of the sub-cavity 38 through the conduit 16 into adaptor 18 and back into chamber 64 . The cleaner moves in and out of the chamber 64 consonant with piston 66 position during bumping.

The bumping process works cleaner into the compression rings 72 thoroughly. This causes the carbon deposits on rings 72 to dissolve into the cleaner. The engine 20 should be bumped several times for optimal results. The user should ideally wait 15 minutes between each bumping in order to allow the cleaner to gradually dissolve the carbon deposits on the compression rings 72 . After the bumping process has been repeated every 15 minutes for the desired amount of time (usually 2 hours), it is time to blow out the cleaner.

The blowing out process is accomplished by attaching a pressurized air source 28 onto snap on connector 26 . Engine 20 should then be turned over continuously for 30 to 60 seconds while user observes the translucent tubes 52 for the presence of cleaner. The pressurized air from the hose 28 forces the cleaner from the sub-cavities 38 down through conduits 16 through adaptors 18 into combustion chambers 64 and then out the exhaust valves 68 of the engine 20 and then out the vehicle's exhaust system. Once tubes 52 are clear of cleaner, the user should continue turning the engine under pressure over for another 15 seconds. The pressure should be turned off. This completes the blow out process.

The valves 42 that were opened should now be closed, and adaptors 18 unscrewed and removed from spark plug holes 70 . New spark plugs should then be screwed into spark plug holes 70 . The disconnected ignition coils should also be reconnected. It is also important to note that the engine oil system should be chemically flushed within one hour of the completion of the squid service. This is done to remove any chemical and/or carbon deposits that may have reached the oil pan below the cleaned piston. The vehicle should never be allowed to sit overnight before performing such an oil flush because any cleaner within the fluid can damage components of the engine.

The removal of carbon deposits from the compression rings restores compression to the cylinders lost due to the buildup of carbon deposits. The effectiveness of compression restoration can be determined by performing a compression check on each cylinder after the cleaning. Besides the compression rings, the squid service also removes carbon deposits from the combustion chamber and valves. Oil ring 74 has been cleanable under prior art methods of power flushing oil systems. However, the squid of the present invention enables the cleaning of compression rings 72 without completely overhauling the engine—an impossibility prior to the present invention. The fact that oil ring 74 could be cleaned by prior art methods was of little significance before this invention because such cleaning would not improve engine performance because of the unremovable buildup carbon deposits on the compression rings. Now that compression rings 72 can be cleaned along with the oil ring 74 , combined cleaning restores overall compression in the combustion chamber 64 with unprecedented effectiveness. This makes squid 10 an important tool in overcoming compression problems caused by carbon deposits on compression rings. This is especially true for modem engines such as the Ford Northstar® that cannot be overhauled. The squid essentially saves the mechanic from having to throw out the engine when carbon deposits cause compression ratios to become unacceptably poor. Now the mechanic can restore compression by merely servicing the engine with cleaner.
 

Last edited by Stealth; 11-06-2009 at 09:40 PM.
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